News

These are the headlines from some of the web sources that I follow.

  • Startup Offers Free Collaboration Option for Any Web Page
    Just as Microsoft blends Yammer into Office365, a startup is offering a free service to add a Facebook-like collaboration tool to any web page. Lifestreams Technologies, a 2-year-old company based in New Haven, Conn., said the widget can be used on any intranet or public-facing website by adding a snippet of code to the html. "Most websites today are relatively static," said Peter Prosol, business development director for the 10-person SaaS firm. "You’ll find pictures and images and text, but it’s more or less as it is. It doesn’t change much. But adding a timeline to your site … it lets you be more dynamic, add new content, refresh and be a little more interactive and engaging to the user." Read full story... Follow us on Twitter Join free newsletter View upcoming events Find a new job
  • Microsoft Kicks Oracle's Big Data Butt
    Oracle CEO Larry Ellison must be feeling the heat, Forbes reports that the world’s highest paid CEO lost $1.9 billion of his wealth last year.There, there Larry, no need for crocodile tears, you’ve got your very own Hawaiian island, an America’s Cup winning yacht, a 23 acre estate that is worth $200 million, as well as a dozen other homes in places like Malibu, Calif., Lake Tahoe, Newport, R.I. and Kyoto, Japan. Never mind the fleet of exotic cars and the golf tournament you own.It’s no wonder that your company isn’t the market-maker it once was. With all those toys and an estimated $49 billion of wealth, who wouldn’t be just a little bit distracted? Read full story... Follow us on Twitter Join free newsletter View upcoming events Find a new job
  • This Week: Forrester's Digital Experience Wave + Yammer Aversion
    No Leaders In Forrester DX Wave Forrester says no one leads in Digital Experience Delivery Platforms. Are they right? Master Customer Experience  Customer experience is morphing once again. Better keep up.  Do People Even Use Yammer?  The problem’s not in the product, but with adoption. Microsoft Wins in Apple-IBM Deal? There may be a silver lining for Microsoft after the big deal. Who’s Who in Internet of Things These 10 are the industry’s leaders, said a marketing influence platform provider. The Next EFSS Leaders Who will succeed in enterprise file sync and share — and who will fade away? Real-Time Analytics Made for Content Marketers Why it’s crucial for marketers to respond in real-time. Download the White Paper sponsored item Most Popular Discussion Point: Where Does HR Go From Here? Getting Comfortable with Google Analytics How Free Puppy Syndrome Can Ruin Your ECM Strategy Dropbox for Business Raises Its Sync and Share Game Could Russia Be Starting a Software/Hardware Cold War? Editor’s Picks One Consultant’s Approach to a Small SharePoint Cleanup Yahoo Buys Flurry to Personalize the Mobile Experience Canadian Marketers, Listen Up: Now Recipients Must Opt-In Shake Off the Dust - and Rediscover the Company Library From Intranet to Net-Work: The Rise of the Digital Bridge Builder Around the Web Harvard Business Review Survey Reveals how B2B Sales Reps Can Win LinkedIn to Pay $175M to Buy B2B Marketing Startup Bizo Solidifying Microsoft Azure Security for SharePoint and SQL in the Cloud Deloitte - Five Questions on Social Business Why The Layoffs At Microsoft Are Bad News For Salesforce.com Featured Events (all events | post your event) July 28 — Sage Summit Las Vegas 2014 July 29 — Silicon Valley Innovation Summit 2014 Aug. 5 — Road Show 2014: Content Sharing and Security Challenges Solved Boston Aug. 12 — Social Media 20/20 Summit San Francisco 2014 Aug. 14 — Road Show 2014: Content Sharing and Security Challenges Solved San Francisco Featured Research  eBook: 25 Ways to Add Real-time Website Personalization The 2014 Marketer’s Guide to Selecting a Web CMS Buyer’s Guide: Choosing the Right SharePoint Management Solution eBook: 5 Best Practices for Internal Video Communications White Paper: SharePoint Governance Best Practices Follow us on Twitter Join free newsletter View upcoming events Find a new job
  • What it Takes to Provide a Seamless Customer Experience
    At the heart of creating a unified conversation across all digital channels are three core technology areas: web content management, e-commerce and mobile platforms. Each of these areas has its own nuances, but it’s the aggregate — the integration of all three — that will determine a brand’s ability to prosper in the age of the customer.CMOs and CTOs are being asked to work together like never before to solve the technology integration riddle in order to achieve high levels of engagement, personalization and loyalty. Read full story... Follow us on Twitter Join free newsletter View upcoming events Find a new job
  • Interns Tell Us What They Would Change At Silicon Valley's Top Companies
    I saw the massive line of interns long before I could see the venue. The young crowd waiting outside Broadway Studios in San Francisco on Tuesday chatted with friends and checked their phones, eagerly awaiting to get inside. Interns line up outside of Internapalooza Approximately 2,000 interns from around the Bay Area signed up to attend Internapalooza, an industry-sponsored event for Silicon Valley’s interns to meet each other, chat up potential employers, and hear some of the tech industry’s finest give advice and share experiences from their younger, soul-searching years. Mike Krieger, co-founder of Instagram, Max Levchin, co-founder of PayPal, and top tech journalist Kara Swisher were among speakers. Overall, the lineup  included eight white men, one man of color, and two white women, which spoke volumes about the current state of tech’s not-so-diverse demographics.Scanning the Internapalooza audience, I was pleasantly surprised at the variety of gender and ethnicity. Examining Silicon Valley’s young generation of interns can tell us a lot about the future of technology and about the new faces of leadership. While there is a lack of diversity among tech's current leaders, the Internapalooza attendees suggest just how multifaceted the future of Silicon Valley may be. The fresh faces of InternapaloozaWaiting in line to get into the sold-out event  felt worse than waiting in line to get into a club. Interns stood shoulder-to-shoulder inside the steamy venue. A few wore business casual, but many were decked out in the true tech wear of t-shirts, jeans and backpacks. The aroma of free hot dogs didn’t help the claustrophobia, nor with the nostalgic feeling of filing into college orientation. Many of the interns in attendance were  college students or recent college graduates—50% of attendees were rising seniors at their universities. One hundred attendees were interns at Salesforce, 90 came from Google, 50 interned at Facebook and another 50 at Apple. Close to 200 interns hailed from UC Berkeley, and more than 150 attendees studied either at Harvard, Stanford or MIT. Interns take their seats to hear from more than 10 leaders in techThe Silicon Valley culture of interns is unlike the Devil Wears Prada, fetching-coffee type of industry jobs, or the kinds of cheap labor positions that are pervasive within Manhattan and Los Angeles’ media-based internships. Here in San Francisco’s tech industry, companies actively seek interns as potential full-time employees, and not just semester-by-semester rotations of unpaid staff. It’s a competitive market and the statistics of the attendees at Internapalooza are proof. Over half of the interns in attendence major in computer science, and 80% have studied something related to engineering. Re/code's Kara Swisher telling it like it isSpeakers hit the stage around 7 p.m, giving life advice in an almost believable, I was a kid once too! fashion. Quick words were said about the necessity of figuring out the rest of their lives. These pieces of advice must have seemed daunting and unreachable coming from the leaders who have already made achievements in technology.For the many interns looking to break into Silicon Valley, their personal stories were a little more raw. Cori Shearer, Intern at PandoraHearing about Internapalooza from a Bay Area interns group on Facebook, Cori Shearer attended, wanting to be inspired.“I’m always on the hustle and grind, so sometimes I need events like this to reinvigorate my energy and to remind myself why I’m here in the first place,” says Shearer. An intern at Pandora, Shearer works in sales technology and on building ad products. She is also quick to discuss the need for more diversity in tech—noting that many startup’s lack of gender and racial variety occurs when founders look only towards their friends to build their company. “You need to be in business with people who aren’t like you, and take risks to start your own company. As a female minority, I really want to do something innovative and helpful in the future,” says Shearer.The Pandora intern hopes to see more people of color on stage at events like Internapalooza. “Not seeing people on stage that looks like you has an effect because you want to be able to look up to someone,” says Shearer. “This affects future generations, but I am hopeful for change.”Brian Clanton, Intern at ZyngaDeveloper Brian Clanton is a first-time intern at Zynga, and hopes one day to become a development lead. Clanton says he finds it difficult to set himself apart from other interns in Silicon Valley’s ultra-competitive race towards tech employment. This feeling is made all too real while standing amongst the hundreds of interns gathered in the venue. “In order to set myself apart I need to do well in school, gain lots of work experience, and just work on different projects,” says Clanton. We awkwardly shuffle amongst groups of interns and gawk at the sheer number of people in attendance. I ask him about the fanaticism surrounding Silicon Valley. What makes the tech industry such an appealing place to work?“Kids want to work in Silicon Valley because there’s an image projected out there that it’s a lot of fun, and that all of these companies have great working environments. They have hammocks! It appeals to a younger generation,” says Clanton.Meron Foster, Intern at Captûre WinesMeron Foster says that she wants to pursue technology because that’s where the future lies. An intern at Captûre Wines, Foster works in sales and events, but not being a technically-inclined person often leaves her feeling left out of the tech bubble. “It’s tough to find jobs in Silicon Valley. It’s a tight-knit circle, and if you’re not ‘a techie’, it’s intimidating to break into that culture. But I’m good at sales and marketing. It’s just hard to portray that to the tech industry without any tech skills,” says Foster. Like Shearer, Foster wants to see more people of color working in tech. Although the hundreds of interns at Internapalooza are diverse in gender and ethnicity, the leaders of tech companies often are not. “Events like this have a lot of young people of color here. Tech has lots of folks of Asian descent, but that’s still a specific color that tech indulges in. This will change with time. There are so many different people, and tech is not closed off to us,” says Foster. Bay Area interns gathered togetherAs I leave the venue, the doorman tells me more than 60 interns who could not initially enter waited throughout the night to get inside. With such overwhelming interest, the tech industry is clearly not hurting for qualified candidates. The draw of Silicon Valley for these interns may be as superficial as hammocks and nap pods, or perhaps it's the in desire for inclusion and for more diverse representation. The students at Internapalooza overall were intelligent, driven, and hopeful for positive change.  We are in good hands. 
  • Amazon Web Services: It's Big, Getting Bigger And Not Slowing Down
    Amazon Web Services is already the 800-pound gorilla in cloud. It offers five times the utilized compute capacity of its next 14 competitors combined and is arguably the fastest-growing software business in history. According to Amazon CTO Werner Vogels, however, this isn't nearly ambitious enough. AWS aims to become an 800,000-pound gorilla. That's because Amazon isn't in the business of "infrastructure as a service," as the process of setting data services such as storage and computation is dubbed in a jargony way. According to Vogels, Amazon is in "the business of pain management for enterprises." And there's a whole lot of pain to manage these days.Amazon's Dominance ProblemWhile not a bully, Amazon tends to dominate the markets it gets into. In retail this means that Amazon outsells its nine closest competitors, combined. While we like to fixate on the success of Apple stores, they move just a fraction of the product Amazon sells, according to data from Internet Retailer:See also: Google's Secret Weapon Against Amazon: Blisteringly Fast NetworksAmazon's retail business generates roughly $70 billion in revenues. In an interview with Recode, Vogels insisted that Amazon has every intention of making AWS as big or bigger than its retail operations:This is a business that will be as big as our retail businesses if not bigger.… It took us six years, or until 2012, to get to 1 trillion objects stored. Then it took us one more year to get to 2 trillion. So that’s an indication of the speed of growth. To my eyes, that it only took a year to get to 2 trillion, it looks like the onset of a hockey stick.In other words, that huge delta between AWS and its cloud rivals? Amazon expects it to get even bigger.Competitors? What Competitors?When asked about competitors, Vogels was quick to assert that Amazon doesn't think about what other cloud providers are doing except "when we want to understand why someone might want to choose something other than AWS."Let's assume he's telling the truth, and the company is completely customer-centric, and not too bothered by what Microsoft or Google might be up to (which might not be wise, as I've argued here and here). See also: What Microsoft's Fiercest Critics Forget: AzureThe reality, however, is that AWS is a bigger threat by far to established software companies than to cloudy new providers. As Credit Suisse IT executive Zohar Melamed states it:In other words, Amazon's rise, as troubling as it may be to its cloud competitors, spells the end of an enterprise software era. That's got to keep the Oracles of the world up at night.Lock-in Rising?So competitors should be worried, but what about customers? With so much of modern workloads running on AWS, do enterprises risk locking themselves into the next Microsoft?Definitely maybe.Vogels, of course, says no way: [Amazon has] worked really hard at not locking our customers in.... There’s no lock-in. Many of our services are really accessible from standard protocols. I’ve never gotten any feedback from our customers saying “please don’t build this.” They all say “please build more....” It’s the same story around standardization. I’ve yet to have a customer say they’re not going to use our stuff because it’s not standardized.Yet according to one AWS partners, Eucalyptus CEO Marten Mickos, the only real way to avoid lock-in is through standardized open source software. As Mickos writes, "What to a customer first looked like an exciting new piece of software—easy to try, no strings attached—soon infests the organization and isn’t quite as easy to remove." So, he suggests, "By using industry-standard open source software products, you reduce your lock-in down to an absolute minimum."AWS runs on a lot of open-source software, of course, but it's not open source itself. While I doubt AWS spends any time trying to find ways to lock its customers in, the reality is that many will be.Not because the code is closed so much as because we keep wanting to build more and more within AWS, just as we used to want to build everything with the Microsoft stack. In sum, while one day we may regret our new Amazon overlord, it seems we're currently all too content to push as much of our IT onto Vogel's shoulders as possible.Lead image of Amazon CTO Werner Vogels by Flickr user The Next Web Photos, CC 2.0


Connect with Me

My Tweets